• Bahamians show a love for sculling at St. Valentine's Regatta
    Bahamians show a love for sculling at St. Valentine's Regatta
  • Art for the Parks spotlights Bahamian beauty
    Art for the Parks spotlights Bahamian beauty
  • Registration opens for Great Abaco Family Fitness Weekend 2014 events March 21-23 at Treasure Cay
    Registration opens for Great Abaco Family Fitness Weekend 2014 events March 21-23 at Treasure Cay
  • Young scientists receive awards
    Young scientists receive awards
  • Small Island Developing States conference calls for greater sustainability
    Small Island Developing States conference calls for greater sustainability
  • Michael Johnson wins JA New Providence and Toastmasters International’s annual speech competition
    Michael Johnson wins JA New Providence and Toastmasters International’s annual speech competition
  • Fishermen's bounty enjoyed at Romora Bay
    Fishermen's bounty enjoyed at Romora Bay
  • U.S. Coast Guard Cutter VIGOROUS Officers and RBDF Marines team up to inspire Woodcock Primary students
    U.S. Coast Guard Cutter VIGOROUS Officers and RBDF Marines team up to inspire Woodcock Primary students
  • 50th Annual Heart Ball a great success
    50th Annual Heart Ball a great success
  • 'Wearable Art meets Wall Art' shows off unique styles at event opening
    'Wearable Art meets Wall Art' shows off unique styles at event opening



BNPA awards Eltha Hall ‘Best Kept Yard Award’
Submitted by BIS   

NASSAU, Bahamas -- Little Blair resident, Eltha Hall, became the winner of a Bahamas National Pride Association's (BNPA) "Best Kept Yard Award" when she was recently presented with a plaque and a cheque.

Pictured in front of the Buccaneer Road home from left: Joanne Johnson, executive director, BNPA; Olvin Rees, chairman, BNPA; Ms Hall; Shaquille Sands, granddaughter; Alphaeus Ramsay, director BNPA; Judy Williams,. director, BNPA.

(BIS Photo/Patrick Hanna)


 

 
Palm Cay completes Marina & Beach Club, latest amenity for seafront community Billfish Grill adds 20 jobs
Submitted by DP&A   

ALL SMILES – Sherrelle Duncombe mixes a refreshing cucumber mojito, a signature drink at the new 126-seat Billfish Grill that opened for residents and guests at Palm Cay this week. Launch of the restaurant created more than 20 jobs and is the latest amenity promised by developers to help foster a sense of community in the dining and marina lifestyle development on the waterfront along Nassau’s southeast coast. (Photos by Derek Smith, Jr., for DPA) NASSAU, Bahamas -- Palm Cay, the fast-growing nautical development on New Providence’s southeastern coast, this week delivered a key component of its commitment to community building -- The Palm Cay Marina & Beach Club.

The club features the flagship Billfish Grill, a restaurant overlooking lawns, pool deck, 194-slip marina and the Atlantic Ocean, fulfilling the latest in Palm Cay’s list of pledges to homeowners.

The Billfish Grill, a partnership between Lise Watson-Russell of Chives at New Providence Community Centre and restaurateur Peter Rounce, opened for dinner for residents and guests this week. Its development was made possible by the support of Palm Cay.

“Our entire business plan is built around creating a community, not just building a development,” explained Palm Cay Sales & Marketing Director Zack Bonczek. “The pools, tennis courts, family playground, the large, full-service marina, even serving as a BASRA outpost, all add to that. But the one ingredient that will give everyone a place to gather that we felt was worth a major investment was a restaurant and we knew we had to get that right.”

Construction took more than six months as the former two and a half storey clubhouse was transformed into the Billfish Grill, complete with sparkling stainless steel floor-to-ceiling kitchen equipment, new stairwells, attractive bar, lighting, landscaping and an array of stylish interior décor and outdoor weather-resistant furniture made by a local manufacturer. The second floor is reserved for private parties and events while the first floor is open for reservations with residents and member privileges and benefits.  

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Books are back on Bay Street
Submitted by DP&A   

BAHAMIAN BOOKS ARE BACK ON BAY – Books about Bahamian history, lore and more are back in historic Nassau, thanks to the opening of The Book Nook inside The Linen Shop. Creation of the reading corner was inspired by shop owners Gloria Raine, left, and Heather White, who started going through a copy of Bahamian Jottings, written by their late grandmother who opened the store, then called Johnstone’s, 68 years ago. They had the book reprinted in time for this Sunday’s formal re-launch and unveiling. (Photo by Derek Smith, Jr., for DPA) 68 Years Later, The Linen Shop Celebrates Re-launch with Book Nook & More

NASSAU, Bahamas -- Nearly seven decades after it opened its doors selling pure Irish linens, The Linen Shop is celebrating its re-launch, bringing back to Bay Street the first book store in the downtown area in more than five years.

Inspiration for The Book Nook inside the shop that has become a staple in historic Nassau with its heavy wooden trim painted a deep forest green came from one of the owners finding a copy of a book of poetry and prose by the shop’s original owner, her late grandmother, Wilhelmina Johnstone.

Bahamian Jottings had been out of print for some time, said Heather White, who with her sister-in-law Gloria Raine, has held on to the traditions of high quality goods in a street increasingly given over to t-shirts and souvenirs.

“When I started going through an old copy of the matriarch of the family’s writings, it was so moving,” said Mrs. White. “Her way of telling what it was like to live in The Bahamas when the hardships were as plentiful as the sun just gave us chills.”

White and Raine said it was like a light bulb.

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Doctors Hospital Corporate Blood Drive: Helping others save lives
Submitted by Jessica Robertson   

Phlebotomist Leante Williamson takes a donor's information.NASSAU, Bahamas -- A desperate attempt to save a life and a call to lend a helping hand to someone in need is what the Lyford Cay school set out to do when they participated in Doctors Hospital’s Corporate Blood Drive program for the second time this year.

The aim of this blood drive, combined with a bake sale, was to raise money for a coworker in need after a fire burnt his house down and to collect blood for a student’s parent who urgently needed blood to assist with his medical care.  It is in moments like these where having the ability to save a life and using it, is crucial.

Blood donation is necessary for a number of key reasons. Blood is needed to treat wounds and for certain illnesses such as cancer, where patients lack sufficient red blood cells. It is also used when patients have to undergo surgeries like organ transplants, bypasses and hip replacements. A Coronary Bypass patient requires 1-6 units. Someone with a bleeding ulcer needs up to 30 units. It could take as many as 50 units to save a car accident victim and cancer patients can require up to 32 units each week.

At the most recent Lyford Cay Blood Drive, eight pints of blood were collected. Once each donated pint is divided into the three components, 24 lives can be saved.

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Abaco Chief Councilor: Treasure Cay environmental damage ‘irreparable, heartbreaking’
Submitted by DP&A   

Left photo shows the wetlands in pristine conditionRight photo shows the destruction of acres of wetlands, slashed by heavy equipment on a site being developed under expansion plans by a resort known as Treasure Sands despite a cease and desist order by government. TREASURE CAY, Abaco -- Abaco’s Chief Councilor today labelled as “heartbreaking” the destruction of acres of wetlands, slashed by heavy equipment on a site being developed under expansion plans by a resort known as Treasure Sands despite a cease and desist order by government.

“I don’t blame the developer,” says North Abaco Chief Councilor Gary Smith. “Nor do I blame the government in Nassau. The Minister of Finance for Investments Khaalis Rolle did the proper and honourable thing and we are very grateful to him for recognizing that protecting the environment and proceeding with the right permits is important for the long-term sustainable growth and development of any community.”

But something thwarted the delivery of the cease and desist order once it got to Abaco, he said, and an investigation is ongoing to learn why it was not presented to the developer for some three weeks after it arrived, enough time for centuries of mangrove, wetlands and hardwood forests to be mowed down. The Abaco Council and two environmental groups, Abaco Defenders and Save The Bays, are trying to get to the bottom of the delay.

“In the three weeks between when the cease and desist order was signed and when it was actually presented to the developer, irreparable damage was done to the wetlands in Treasure Cay,” said Smith. “Before, this place was a haven -- a sanctuary for birds and bonefish. You could see the nurse sharks coming in and the baby nurse sharks. The wetlands were the nursery for all sorts of species.” The Bahamas National Trust had plans to turn the area into a national park. Today, the scarfed land is a stark reminder, said Smith, of how quickly something that took centuries to form can be wiped out.

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